Hoffman-Madison Waterfront Kicks Off Massive Mixed-Use Project in D.C.

Work has started on phase 1 of the Wharf on Washington in the district’s southwest waterfront. It is the beginning of a massive mixed-use project roughly a decade in the making.
Image credit: Perkins Eastman

Image credit: Perkins Eastman

By Dees Stribling, Contributing Editor

Washington, D.C.—Work has started on phase 1 of the Wharf on Washington in the district’s southwest waterfront. It is the beginning of a massive mixed-use project roughly a decade in the making, including approvals by the Washington City Council and votes of Congress, and the involvement of numerous private commercial and residential real estate entities.

The first phase alone comprises 24 acres of land, with more than 50 acres of waterfront, and is slated for completion in 2017. The residential component will include 240 condo units and 648 apartments. Other kinds of space will include a 680-room hotel, about 200,000 square feet of retail and 435,000 square feet of office. There will also be a cultural and performing arts space that measures about 140,000 square feet.

The Wharf is a large-scale waterfront development by Hoffman-Madison Waterfront as part of the district’s Anacostia Waterfront Initiative. The Wharf development team is led by PN Hoffman and Madison Marquette, and is comprised of ER Bacon Development, City Partners, Paramount Development and Triden Development.

Perkins Eastman is serving as master planner, design architect, and architect of record for the public realm, infrastructure and buildings in two of the initial parcels. Perkins Eastman’s public realm design includes various components of the Wharf, including the District Pier, Transit Pier, Market Pier, Mews, and two levels of below-grade parking to accommodate more than 1,500 vehicles. New construction along the water’s edge will include the Pierhouse Pavilion on the District Pier, the Dockmaster Building and the Jetty Terminal.

According to the architect, the design aims to reconnect the city to its waterfront, providing D.C. residents with a public destination for year-round use, and restoring Washington as a port city (as it once was). Small lots are being constructed along the water’s edge in order to preserve panoramic views of the waterfront and Washington Channel from multiple vantage points.