Milhaus Unveils Arsenal Terminal Redevelopment Plan in Pittsburgh

A 625-unit apartment community proposed by Milhaus Ventures could soon rise in Lawrenceville, one of the largest neighborhoods in Pittsburgh.

PittsburghMilhaus Ventures of Indianapolis is planning to develop a 625-unit apartment community in Lawrenceville, which might become the largest redevelopment project in the neighborhood. The more than 12-acre property, also known as the Arsenal Terminal Building Site, spans a block along Butler Street from 39th to 40th streets.

Milhaus is proposing 625 apartments in Lawrenceville

Milhaus is proposing 625 apartments in Lawrenceville, Pa.

The developer has presented its proposal to the Zoning Board of Adjustment with conditional agreements in place from two key community organizations in the neighborhood, the Pittsburgh Business Times reported. After having jointly organized community meetings that generated input from more than 400 residents, the Lawrenceville Corp. and Lawrenceville United submitted a letter of support that included 11 conditions on which Milhaus’ approval from the Zoning Board would depend.

The requirements include a pedestrian way through the site, reaching a green space of nearly an acre; streetscape and public transit stops; as well as the extension of two streets that would improve neighborhood connections at the developer’s expense. Milhaus would also need to preserve two historic assets of the property that was once used as a 19th century arsenal. These include an 1866-era building that served as the officer’s quarters and an old stone wall.

Milhaus is asking for two special exceptions from the Zoning Board. One of these would change the site’s zoning from industrial to multiunit residential, while the other would allow the developer to build up to five stories in portions of the project that are expected to stay below a 60-foot height requirement.

If approved, the new development would also bring more than 21,000 square feet of retail space fronting Butler Street from 39th to 40th Streets, along with 669 parking spaces. The project, which is subject to ongoing review by city planning, is expected to cost between $125 million and $150 million.

Rendering courtesy of Strada Architecture