Detroit to Welcome $102M Brush Park Developments

Brush House, Brush 8 and Brush + Watson will bring 367 new units to to the city's historic neighborhood. About one third of the units will be affordable.
Brush House (Image courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects)
Brush House (Image courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects)

Expansion continues in Detroit’s Brush Park neighborhood with three projects totaling $102 million developed by City Growth Partners and American Community Developers Inc. Of the 367 units planned, 34 percent will be affordable—for residents making as low as 30 percent of the area median income, which is approximately $16,000 a year.

Detroit-based City Growth Partners is working on two communities: Brush House and Brush 8. The first is a $52 million mixed-use development expected to break ground in fall 2019 and scheduled for completion in 2021. Of its 179 units, 36 will be saved for residents earning 80 percent of AMI or less. The community will also include 15,660 square feet of ground-floor retail and 127 underground parking spaces. Brush 8, also planned to break ground in 2019, is a $5 million residential development that will offer eight luxury townhomes.

Affordable high-quality housing

Brush + Watson (Image courtesy of Oombra Architects)
Brush + Watson (Image courtesy of Oombra Architects)

Local affordable housing developer American Community Developers Inc. is planning to break ground on Brush + Watson in late 2019. Expected to be completed by 2021, the $45 million project designed by Oombra Architects will add 180 units to the neighborhood. Half of the apartments will be set aside as affordable—45 for residents making 80 percent of AMI and the rest for residents making 30-60 percent of AMI. Monthly rental rates for these units will range from $400 to $700. Brush + Watson, located on the corner of Brush and Watson St., will also provide 8,500 square feet of street-level retail and 170 underground parking spaces.

“We plan to use this mixed-income model in Brush Park as a prototype for creating high-quality housing with rents that people can afford in neighborhoods across the city,” Mike Essian, vice president of American Community Developers Inc., said in prepared remarks.