CetraRuddy to Convert NYC Landmark into Rental Apartments

Formerly used as a hospital services wing, the historic property will be transformed into market-rate rental apartments ready for occupancy in mid-2019.

New YorkCetraRuddy, an architecture and interiors firm has announced its plan to convert a historic New York City landmark into market-rate apartments, from the buildings original use as a hospital services wing. Located at 30 Morningside Drive, the residential conversion has been commissioned by the developer Delshah Capital. The conversion of the five Beaux-Arts structures is comprised of four French Renaissance Revival pavilions and a carriage house located at the center.

Hospital service wing that will be converted to rental apartments.

Hospital service wing that will be converted to rental apartments.

Originally built between 1893 and 1928, the site was formerly occupied by Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital. The Plant and Scrysmer pavilions were designed by America Beaux-Art architect Ernest Flagg, designated as a landmark in 2002.

The redevelopment will include a new infill and transformation of the interiors into residential units. According to Eugene Flotteron, director of architecture at CetraRuddy, the project will provide 205 units of housing throughout the four buildings and the carriage house will be converted into an amenities space for residents.

“The work is technically complex and an intricate conversion project, creating a single residential experience while working with separate structures containing varied floor height and even different structural systems,” said Flotteron.

The buildings will retain the historic fabric of the existing structures in compliance with the historic landmark regulations.

“This project represents a great opportunity to preserve an architecturally significant piece of New York’s history and urban fabric, and to repurpose it for the future. 30 Morningside will also be a great example of how the challenges of historic adaptive reuse projects can lead to unique and interesting solutions,” Flotteron told Multi-Housing News. “It will feature large windows, restored original balconies, rooftop amenities, and even some apartment layouts offering 18-foot ceilings and double-height living areas.”

Initial work on the site has begun, with more construction to start up in the new year. Completion of the project is expected for mid-2019.

Image Courtesy of CetraRuddy