Work Starts on Reno’s 1st Student Housing High-Rise

Canyon Partners Real Estate, GMH Communities and CRG are building the 755-bed project.
Academy at Reno. Rendering courtesy of Canyon Partners

Canyon Partners Real Estate, GMH Communities and CRG have broken ground on the first high-rise student housing project in Reno, Nev. Dubbed the Academy at Reno, the 755-bed community will serve the undergraduates at the University of Nevada. Construction is set to commence immediately.

Slated for completion for the 2023 fall semester, Academy at Reno received $36.2 million in equity funding from Canyon. Citizens Bank and Nevada State Bank provided a $75.2 million senior construction loan.

Featuring a mix of one- to five-bedroom units, the project was designed by Humphreys & Partners Architects and will target LEED Silver certification. Clayco will serve as the general contractor, while HPA Design Group is providing interior design services.

Academy at Reno will rise at the center of the campus, across from the university’s primary entrance. South from the Nevada Regional 659, the location is adjacent to the Rancho San Rafael Regional Park and a variety of dining options.

The site is situated at the crossing of North Virginia Street and 15th Street, within a Qualified Opportunity Zone. This marks Canyon’s ninth joint venture equity investment in an opportunity zone.

Student housing architecture and design trends

In the wake of COVID-19, adaptability and flexibility have become more important than ever, with student housing principles concentrated on spaces that prioritize physical and mental wellbeing

Architects and designers seek to link projects to nature and include amenities such as fitness centers and study lounges that incorporate the outdoors—either through large windows or operable walls that can be opened.

In order to adjust to the pandemic-shaped normalcy, rooms or apartments are designed with social distancing in mind. But at the same time, designers strive to maintain a sense of community, so that students can still enjoy the traditional college experience.