UDC Set to Break Ground on DFW Seniors Housing

Construction is slated to being in June on Rochester Springs Assisted Living and Memory Care in Mansfield, a suburb in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.
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Mansfield, Texas—Construction is slated to being in June on Rochester Springs Assisted Living and Memory Care in Mansfield, a suburb in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. UDC Global is the developer of the project. When complete in mid-2015, it will include 51 assisted living units and 44 memory care units.

The property will be part of a larger office and mixed-use campus on the corner of Matlock Rd and East Broad St. Rochester Springs’ ground floor will feature two “neighborhoods” of memory care residences and common areas organized around exterior secured activity courts, with the second floor featuring assisted living residences and common areas.

According to the project’s architect, three: living architecture, the units have been designed to function as either assisted living or memory care units and also comply with local and state requirements for both. This way, if more assisted living and less memory care is needed in a few months, or even years down the road, the unit numbers can easily change without requiring regulation-specific alterations. The design also incorporates necessary plumbing rough-ins and future wall and door openings in the structural framing plan to maximize flexibility.

In fact, flexibility is at the heart of the property’s design. Cliff Holasek, senior associate at Dallas-based three: living architecture, tells MHN that “in our years of designing senior environments, we’ve repeatedly heard executive directors, activities coordinators, and staff emphasize that the flexibility of space is paramount in the programming, use, and marketing of each community.  We’ve seen these cues develop concurrently in our hospitality projects, where lobbies now have multiple functions as lounges, food and beverage venues, and business centers.”

Because of improved technology, designing flexible spaces is now easier than it used to be. “Today’s technology is quickly becoming integral to providing flexibility of spaces,” Holasek says. “Theaters, conference rooms, chapels, and other activity spaces can occur in one space—though not necessarily simultaneously! In public areas, movement is encouraged through spaces—not along spaces—that can be seen from a circulation corridor. This enlivens the environments, while promoting communication and interaction.”