Tucson’s Tallest Highrise Signs Two New Tenants

One South Church, downtown Tucson’s tallest building will accommodate two new major tenants. Global engineering firm HDR signed a lease agreement for 9,659 square feet of space and flexible work space provider Regus will occupy the entire 12,659-square-foot 12th floor.

One South Church

One South Church, downtown Tucson’s tallest building will accommodate two new major tenants. Global engineering firm HDR signed a lease agreement for 9,659 square feet of space and flexible work space provider Regus will occupy the entire 12,659-square-foot 12th floor.

One South Church was constructed in 1986 and the landmark high-rise office building was originally planned to have a twin tower that was never built. First known as the United Bank Tower, it has changed labels several times until 2011 when it got its current name. The 23-story facility is located minutes of Interstate-10 along the new Sun Link Modern Streetcar route in one of Tucson’s major employment centers along with the University of Arizona and Tucson International Airport.

Based in Omaha, Neb., HDR is an architectural, engineering and consulting firm with over 8,500 professionals and a portfolio including hundreds of projects all over the nation and in 60 countries worldwide. The company participated lately in the Sun Link Modern Streetcar project and their relocation from Williams Centre brings them right onto the streetcar’s 3.9-mile route.

Regus, which has 21 Phoenix-metro locations in top office assets, enters the Tucson market with this new lease. The new center is slated to open in mid-December, following a series of tenant improvements. The flexible work space provider also plans an expansion in the northern precincts with foreseeable delivery in 2015.

The landlord, Chicago-based Equity Commonwealth was represented by Buzz Isaacson of CBRE’s Tucson office. Kevin Calihan with CBRE’s Phoenix office represented Regus, and Pat Williams with JLL’s Phoenix office spoke for HDR in the transactions.

Photo courtesy of Ken Lund via Wikimedia Commons