Revised Tavaci Mixed-Use Project Sparks Discussions

By Gabriel Circiog, Associate Editor Representatives of the Tavaci mixed-use project at Big Cottonwood Canyon, including Terry Diehl, presented their project plans to the Cottonwood Heights city council. Local residents also had a chance to express their opinions regarding the project. The Tavaci [...]

Representatives of the Tavaci mixed-use project at Big Cottonwood Canyon, including Terry Diehl, presented their project plans to the Cottonwood Heights city council. Local residents also had a chance to express their opinions regarding the project.

The Tavaci project was initially approved by the Salt Lake County Council in 2004 to include 43 lots for luxury homes. With more than 40 acres of open space, mountain and valley views, as well as close proximity to the entrance to Big Cottonwood Canyon, the gateway to two world-class ski resorts, the luxury gated community offers many amenities. Five of the lots are already under development, according to the project’s Web site, with designs by Guy Dreier in an organic-contemporary styling.

According to Desert News, Diehl had to revise his plans due to the changes in the economy, and turned his attention to a resort-style community project. The Salt Lake Tribune reported plans including a 125-room hotel, condominiums, restaurants, office space and other retail facilities. The Cottonwood Heights Planning Commission recommended the plan for Canyon Resort Residential zone in August 2009, but the council members weren’t on board with the ordinance, thus the project remained in limbo. The main concerns related to height, density and the impact of the project on the traffic through the canyon.

A vote was never cast on the issue, but Diehl introduced revisions to the initial plans in the hope that the city council will reconsider the ordinance and reach a decision. From the initial 90 feet, the building heights have been reset to a maximum of 50, the ridge line homes at just 25 feet. Diehl’s attorney, Bruce Baird, announced that a study showed the high-density development will not impact the traffic, although some local residents didn’t agree.

A decision is expected after a vote in August.