Rehab Complete on Suburban Dallas Affordable Property

Work has been completed on the extensive renovation of Britain Way, a 168-unit affordable multifamily property in Irvine that was originally built a half century ago.

Irving, Texas—Work has been completed on the extensive renovation of Britain Way, a 168-unit affordable multifamily property in Irvine that was originally built a half century ago. The owner, OM Housing, as well as BGO Architects, Fore Property Company Management and CANV Construction, collaborated on the redevelopment project.

Built in 1962, the property had been noticeably deteriorating in recent years, according to the redevelopers, including code violations that needed correcting. It had no community center, clubhouse, swimming pool or resident lifestyle services to speak of. The on-site drainage and lighting were poor, the property lacked perimeter fencing, and each of its two- and three-bedroom apartments included only one bathroom.

Due to the age of the facility, asbestos and lead-based paint were also problems before remodeling began in January 2012. But the development went further than just abating these harmful substances; the project team designed the facility to meet LEED gold standards, and added a number of features to enhance the property’s sense of community.

For example, the new Britain Way was designed to meet Irving Police’s “Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design” requirements, which focuses on correcting aspects of buildings and properties that make it easier for criminals to operate. OM Housing visited with Irving Police early in the design process to make sure the property ultimately met those requirements. Among other things, the property was made safer by adding perimeter fencing and increasing lighting levels throughout the site.

Other changes to the property included expanding kitchens, second bathrooms in some of the larger units, a clubhouse and community center, and an on-site resident activities coordinator to help residents connect with community services.  Financing for the rehabilitation was through the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, in conjunction with the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Dougherty Mortgage, and PNC Real Estate.