Manhattan Condo Calls for Art Lovers

Developers put the finishing touches on a sophisticated luxury condo tower for the artsy elite.

MADGI 560 West 24th Street NYC exterior 1 medNew York—The most coveted art block in West Chelsea just got even more artistically vibrant now that developers have completed a new luxury building—one that was designed for art collectors and people affiliated with the arts.

A unique partnership between developers Adam Gordon Holdings and Tavros Development recently wrapped up work on an 11-story tower located at 560 W 24th St. directly across the street from the Gagosian Gallery in Manhattan’s trendy High Line arts district.

Designed by Montroy Andersen DeMarco (MADGI) and Steven Harris Architects, the 40,000-square-foot luxury building includes eight residences: six full-floor, single-level units on floors two to seven, as two duplexes on floors eight-nine and 10-11.

“The building and residences within were designed to accommodate the specific needs of art collectors attracted to the area, which is known for numerous art galleries and its cultural life.  The units feature expansive walls and lighting designed for art display. The glass-enclosed top duplex features a roof overhang that protects artwork within from direct sunlight,” said MADGI Principal Richard J. DeMarco, AIA.

Ranging in size from approximately 3,200 square feet to 6,000 square feet and featuring outdoor spaces, including balconies and large terraces in the duplexes, the residences come with multi-zone heating and cooling systems with humidity controls, as well plywood-reinforced walls and lighting designed for art display.

The building also features a lobby on the ground floor, as well as the main exhibit space for the prominent C24 art gallery that occupies total of 4,500 square feet of space on the building’s first two stories. C24 Gallery provides a platform for contemporary artists in all formats and media who have received critical acclaim in various art galleries around the world and is dedicated to a geographically diverse program. The gallery’s lower floor features an atrium rising 22 feet and adorned with a skylight.