Keep Your Outdoor Amenity Spaces Toasty Year Round with Lava Heat

From exquisitely decorated rooftop lounges to pools that would look at home in a travel magazine, developers are constantly trying to one up the neighborhood in order to secure top of the market rents and occupancies. But unless it's located in a Southern state, that outdoor space is functionally useless for a big chunk of the year when temperatures cool.
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Lava Heat Italia Patio Heater 2G

Outdoor amenity spaces have come a long way in recent years. From exquisitely decorated rooftop lounges to pools that would look at home in a travel magazine, developers are constantly trying to one up the neighborhood in order to secure top-of-the-market rents and occupancies. But unless you’re in a Southern state, that outdoor space is functionally useless for a big chunk of the year when temperatures cool. The resort-style communities of South Florida can even use a bit of help to get through the winter months.

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Lava Heat Opus Patio Heater

That is where the patio heater comes into play. Before your design team brushes off the idea of disturbing the visual harmony of such outdoor spaces, check out the design-forward heaters being built by Lava Heat Italia. Their top-of-the-line Lava Heat Italia Patio Heater 2G is sure to bring heat and high design to your space. The centerpiece of the eight-foot heater is a 4-foot flame encased in a weatherproof borosilicate glass tube.

The unit generates 66,000 BTUs of heat which emanates in 360-degrees across a 36-square-foot area. Automatic infrared electronic ignition starts with the touch of a button. The Lava Heat 2G ships in a standard propane configuration, but it can also be ordered with a natural gas upgrade that includes a 10-foot quick connect gas line if you are looking for a permanent, four-season placement.

Of course if a more rounded design fits better with your space, Lave Heat has you covered with a full range of heaters. The Opus heater, for instance, has all the technology of the 2G in a slightly smaller, cylindrical style. The three-foot flame generates 51,000 BTUs that will still warm up to a 36 square foot area.

(Photos courtesy Lava Heat Italia.)