ESCC Tapped for Security and Communications Services at Cornell Tech’s Residential Building

The New York-based company got involved in the project from the early stages of development to implement a unique security and communications system.
Rendering of Cornell Tech Campus

Rendering of Cornell Tech Campus

New YorkElectronic Security and Communications Corp. (ESCC) was selected for the design and implementation of the security and communications system for Cornell Tech’s residential building. The structure, currently under construction on Roosevelt Island, is the first high-rise residential building to meet Passive House standards which reduce energy consumption and costs to create a healthier and more comfortable environment.

The property required a one-of-a-kind approach that would ensure the right communications and security solutions. ESCC’s professionals got involved in the project from the early stages and worked together with Cornell University, Related Companies, Hudson Companies, Monadnock Construction, and Handel Architects for optimum results.

“We are extremely honored to work with the first class list of developers, construction managers, and architects that helped bring this environmentally sound building to life in a short time span,” Robert Horowitz, president at ESCC, said in a prepared statement.

The 26-story residential tower is part of the new Cornell Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island in New York. The property will offer 350 rental apartments for students and faculty members and aims for LEED Silver and NYSERDA ENERGY STAR certifications. The project is slated for completion in the summer of 2017, while the entire campus (including future developments) will open and be fully operational in 2037.

ESCC is a New York-based company with 30 years of experience in the industry, offering full service design and consulting services in security and communications, including CCTV surveillance systems, access control systems, perimeter security systems, audio/video intercom systems, and complete low voltage telecommunications systems.

Image courtesy of Cornell Tech