Downtown Cleveland Property Wins Preservation Prize

Saint Luke’s Manor in Cleveland recently won the National Trust/HUD Secretary’s Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation.

Cleveland—Saint Luke’s Manor in Cleveland recently won the National Trust/HUD Secretary’s Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation. The awards are given to individuals, nonprofit organizations, public agencies and corporations “whose skill and determination breathe life into their communities through architectural and cultural preservation,” according to the National Trust and HUD.

Saint Luke’s Manor, formerly known as St. Luke’s Hospital, is a 390,000-square-foot structure in downtown Cleveland built in the late 1920s. The hospital ceased operations in 1999 but was placed on the National Historic Register in 2005 for its significance as a local architectural landmark and for its contributions to the growth of the health care industry in Cleveland.

After sitting vacant for 12 years, Neighborhood Progress Inc. and Pennrose redeveloped the building in 2011 and 2012 into 137 units of low-income rental housing for seniors and office space for local nonprofit organizations. Saint Luke’s Manor anchors the Buckeye Neighborhood Plan, a 20-acre revitalization effort including a new public library, elementary school, market-rate for-sale units and a renovated Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority train station.

Funding for the redevelopment was the usual complex mix of sources. The city of Cleveland, the Ohio Housing Finance Agency, the Ohio Department of Development, Enterprise Community Investment and PNC Bank all funded the project with assistance from low-income and federal and state historic tax credits.

Co-recipients of the award are Artography Studios; City of Cleveland; Enterprise Community Investment, Inc.; Mistick Construction Co.; Neighborhood Progress Inc.; Ohio Development Services Agency; Ohio Housing Finance Agency; PNC Bank; and Wallace Roberts & Todd LLC. Pennrose is a multifamily specialist that develops and operates both market-rate and affordable communities in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Alabama and Tennessee.