Commuters Rejoice: Proposed Sky Gondola to Alleviate Traffic, Reduce Travel Times Between Manhattan and Brooklyn

An online real estate company wants to jazz up New York City’s soaring transportation system by proposing an innovative solution: an urban gondola that would run—scratch that, float—between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and possibly even Queens.

An online real estate company wants to jazz up New York City’s soaring transportation system by proposing an innovative solution: an urban gondola that would run between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and possibly even Queens.

East River Skyway - proposed gondola project

East River Skyway – proposed gondola project

Dubbed East River Skyway, the high-speed gondola was proposed at the recent Massey Knakal Brooklyn Real Estate Summit by Daniel Levy, a Williamsburg resident and president of CityRealty, and was inspired by similar transportation projects that are already in use in Singapore, England, Brazil, Germany, and even Romania—where, in 2004, a partnership between private investors and Constanța city authorities inaugurated a €3.5 million (or $4.51 million) gondola system that runs above Mamaia, an upscale beach resort on the Romanian Black Sea shore.

According to Crain’s New York Business, the proposed gondola would cost $75 million to $125 million to complete, including the cost of the stations, and would be built in stages, with the first phase running from Lower Manhattan to Williamsburg.

Expected to carry around 5,000 commuters and tourists per hour in each direction, the high-speed gondola would cross the East River in less than four minutes and reduce traveling time from Brooklyn to Manhattan to under 30 minutes while offering 360-degree views of New York City’s skyline.

“Given the exciting growth in Brooklyn and Queens, it is essential to adapt New York City’s transportation system to serve residents in these booming areas,” said Daniel Levy, president of East River Skyway and CityRealty, in a press statement. “Cities around the globe are recognizing the viability and efficiency of urban gondolas to overcome serious transportation challenges. An aerial transportation system would be a relatively inexpensive and quickly deployable solution here in New York.”

With new developments expected to grow with approximately 5,700 residential units and around 600,000 square feet of space in Brooklyn alone, congestion is worse than ever in this part of the city, and so is air pollution. Apart from connecting the rapidly growing areas along the Brooklyn and Queens waterfronts, the East River Skyway would be safer, faster, more reliable, greener—as it would have zero emissions—and cheaper to build than any traditional transportation line.

Click here for more market data on New York City.

Rendering via East River Skyway