City Goes Green with Food Waste Disposal Pilot Program

A new program called “Clean Kitchen, Green Community” was recently launched in Philadelphia to assess how food waste disposers could help the city become greener.

Philadelphia—A new program called “Clean Kitchen, Green Community” was recently launched in Philadelphia to assess how food waste disposers could help the city become greener. For the project the city is partnering with InSinkErator, a manufacturer of food waste disposers, and community groups OARC (Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corporation) and Diversified Community Services.

On average, a family of four generates 17 pounds of food waste per week, which goes directly into landfills. Food waste accounts for 10 percent of waste from homes in Philadelphia, and every ton of waste diverted from a landfill saves the city money in tip fees. The use of food waste disposers will help the city save money while not adding to the homeowner’s utility costs because they cost less than 50 cents per year in electricity.

For this initiative, 100 homeowners will get a food waste disposer installed by certified plumber so that household waste will be reduced. The City will test the waste produced before and after this program to evaluate the changes.

“Food waste disposers are a proven way to keep food scraps out of landfills,” David McNair, vice president of marketing, InSinkErator, tells MHN. “We’re proud to work with the City of Philadelphia, and eager to help the community keep kitchens and buildings clean by keeping food waste out of dumpsters and landfills. Instead, it will be sent to Philadelphia’s wastewater treatment plants where it can be turned into renewable energy, fertilizer products and clean water. It’s a win-win for all.”