Alamance Regional Medical Center Plans $60M Expansion

by Adriana Pop, Associate Editor Alamance Regional Medical Center is planning a $60 million expansion, the largest since the hospital opened in 1995. According to The Business Journal, the campus improvement project includes a two-story, 40,000-square-foot cancer center to be located at the end of the Medical Arts building. The facility will feature new space [...]

by Adriana Pop, Associate Editor

Alamance Regional Medical Center is planning a $60 million expansion, the largest since the hospital opened in 1995.

According to The Business Journal, the campus improvement project includes a two-story, 40,000-square-foot cancer center to be located at the end of the Medical Arts building. The facility will feature new space for a family resource center, community education, support groups and a healing garden.

Furthermore, the project calls for the construction of a more spacious day surgery area with nine large operating rooms. As a result of increased patient flow, which is expected to accelerate in the coming years, the emergency department will also be expanded by 28,000 square feet.

Due to the high cost of the development, the Burlington-based medical center must receive approval from state regulators through the certificate of need process, the newspaper reports. The projects are part of a five-year, $150 million capital improvement plan that includes construction as well as improved medical equipment and information technology infrastructure.

Alamance Regional and Greensboro-based Cone Health are pursuing a merger they first proposed in mid-December. The two health systems are currently in the due diligence period and will present their plans to the Federal Trade Commission this summer.

In other news, the CityBizList reports that Market at Colonnade, a 57,637-square-foot ground-up infill center in Raleigh has received LEED Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The center, anchored by Whole Foods Market, is owned by Regency Centers, a national owner, operator and developer of grocery-anchored and community shopping centers.

“We believe greengenuity leads to better risk management and cost savings, improves our communities, encourages innovation and is in the best interest of our shareholders,” says Mark Peternell, Regency’s vice president of sustainability.

Since 2009, 80 percent of Regency’s development and redevelopment projects have sought LEED certification. At the moment, the company has 17 LEED-registered projects, including five that have received final certification, three under construction, and nine in predevelopment.

Photo credits: http://www.rodgersbuilders.com